Travel Management Planning is just one step towards complete wilderness. Let me show you how.

It’s hard for your average person to comprehend a scenario where non-governmental organizations buy up rural private property to create wildlife preserves with a goal to turn 50% of the United States into Wilderness. If you’re concerned about road closures, then strap on your tinfoil hat and get ready for this one.
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Congressional nullification opens the door for Arizona courts to decide on road closures

Nullifying The USDA Forest Service Travel Management Rule 36 CFR 212 will open the door for an Arizona court of competent jurisdiction to close roads over Federal public lands. Local control could be the best chance we have to keep motorized access open. Continue reading

Facing thousands of miles of trail closures, we took it to Washington for a final solution.

After years of trail closures, the Arizona people had enough. Over 10,000 miles of trails on BLM land were facing closure in 2018, and something had to be done. The result saved and re-opened thousands of miles of trails across America, and many people still don’t know about the glorious victory. Continue reading

The future of outdoor recreation lies in your hands

We are rapidly losing recreational opportunities across the west. I am not asking for your money. Nor am I asking you to attend any meetings or submit comments on a terrible land-use issue. We are reaching out to you to gain support and send a message to our Congressmen. It’s time to take this to Washington for a real solution. Please keep reading…
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You may have seen this transmission line along state Route 74 near Lake Pleasant.

While searching through comments on an APS proposal for a new transmission line, I found something disturbing. The comment below is from the Grand Canyon chapter of the Sierra Club. Their argument is there’s not enough evidence to support the Environmental Impact Assessment findings of “no environmental impact” from the new transmission line.

The Environmental Impact Assessment is required by law to show the potential impact on endangered species and other wildlife in the immediate project area. The proposal calls for a 20 foot wide Trail to be carved through the mountains along the transmission line’s length. In this case, the environmental assessment claims that there will be no environmental impact on endangered species or other wildlife.
The Bureau of Land Management’s response is quite enlightening.

“The analysis to special status species that COULD occur in the area are disclosed in the FEIS/PRMP AS IF THEY WHERE PRESENT WHERE SUITABLE HABITAT OCCURS FOR THOSE SPECIES.” Says the Bureau of Land Management in their response.  

This means that the endangered species doesn’t necessarily exist in the area or call this place home. This means that it’s a suitable place for them to thrive. There is no actual science showing the impact on endangered species; it’s all theoretical.

Commonly used tactic or just a coinkidink?

We continually see the excuse of endangered species habits to close down our trails all over Arizona and the US. Theoretically, the entire Sonoran Desert is the correct habitat for the Sonoran desert tortoise. With that logic, BLM could shut down the entire Sonoran Desert. It’s an outrageous assumption that the people impact endangered species by using motorized access to our public lands, and a new trail and transmission line somehow does not. Furthermore, it’s an outrageous assumption to treat every single habitat as if the species is present.

One can only assume. Is the Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service doing this with Environmental Impact Statements for our Travel Management Plans? Ultimately, the Sierra Club is correct. There is not enough science, and what is available is outdated. Doesn’t this sound familiar?

See the screenshots below.

Grand Canyon Sierra Club comment on the Sun Valley to Morgan Travis Mission line
the Bureau of Land Management response to the Sierra Club comment on the Sun Valley to Morgan Travis Mission line

It should come as no surprise that Arizona is a focal point for outdoor enthusiasts all over the U.S. and the world. Our landscapes are beautiful, our wildlife is unique, and for years, we have maintained a delicate balance between recreation and nature. No matter your recreational activity of choice, we are all passionate about preserving our beautiful Arizona. We do not believe in making new trails, destroying natural landscapes, or dumping trash. We do not want to threaten endangered wildlife or delicate ecosystems.

Destroying history in the name of environmentalism. When is it ever gonna change?We do not want our trails closed down. Our trails are a footprint of the pioneers who came before us. It’s important to understand our history to grasp this idea. Like the rest of the west, our ancestors came here searching for gold, agriculture, and other forms of work. Today you can visit a ghost town and only imagine what it was like back in its heyday. It’s hard to understand that towns like Wickenburg, Jerome, and Tombstone were once connected by dirt trails. It often took multiple days on horseback to travel from town to town. Outlaws, attacks by natives, raging rivers, and unfortunate accidents were just some of the obstacles they faced daily.

The idea? The American Dream!

Today’s ghost towns like Bradshaw City, Tip Top, and others once had hundreds of people living there. The only difference is, some survived and some did not. Just about every Arizona town and city started off as a small mining camp or a farm town. Phoenix, Arizona, was founded in 1881 and was once nothing but farmland. People traveled from all over Arizona to trade multiple items for grain and other foods. Today, Phoenix is the 6th largest city in the US and the capital of Arizona. Prescott, Arizona, was once called Fort Whipple and was founded in 1863. Originally a Military base that supported hundreds of us troops to help protect settlers. Prescott now supports a population of 42,500 people and is well known for its downtown historic district and Whisky Row.
Many things were considered while building these routes. Trails were created in every direction with the straightest possible route. It took an incredible amount of labor under the hot Arizona sun. The Military built a lot of these trails to haul supplies and protect settlers. It was important to access water and food and supplies needed along the way. Stage stops were created at various water springs, ranches, mining camps, and other convenient places. Stage stops were vital to the survival of travelers and their pack animals. Eventually, commerce and trade developed at stage stops, Jobs were created, towns were built, and the trail was vital to the area’s settlers. They were living the American dream.

Destroying history in the name of environmentalism. When is it ever gonna change?

Today, our history is plagued by environmentalism. Hundreds of thousands of miles of historical routes all over the US have been removed from the map under the name of environmentalism. Wealthy organizations control the policy with intimating tactics that push our lawmakers and land managers into a corner. These organizations are forcing disturbing policies that violate the vital laws that give the Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service its powers. Only large corporations have the money and resources to fight a multi-million dollar lawsuit. Lawsuits have dictated the outcome of decision making rather than the actual science. Organizations like the American Sand Association have spent millions on keeping areas open for recreation and the fight continues into the foreseeable future.
Mining and agriculture in some states have nearly been wholly eliminated which causes a chain reaction through the lives of every American. 

We need to understand that things are changing now! 

Our voice matters now more than ever. A lot of executive powers have been canceled. More laws by our legislatures are being introduced to rollback the overreaching power that has been rigorously pushed through. Not only do we need to urge our legislators to support the people who voted for them. We also need to voice our opinion in a way that matters. Factual, detailed information is key.

This will all change when we pressure our lawmakers and elected officials to do the right thing. Most of us can agree that our comments to the Bureau of Land Management won’t make a difference to the final decision. I will, however, send a tsunami of opposing opinions to our elected officials. Our attorney general, sheriffs, representatives and congressmen, and woman are in the highest position of power to fix these issues. They will do what they need to keep your vote. Let’s call them and urge them to protect Arizona’s historical legacy, mining, agriculture, and outdoor recreation.  

Kingman Travel Management Plan environmental assessment released. Public commenting open!

The Bureau of Land Management wants to hear from you! They want to hear from those who use these trails. They are giving the public an opportunity to voice their opinion. Inside this page, you will find detailed documents regarding studies and other information about the Kingman Travel Management Plan. The environmental assessment has been released and the BLM is requesting comments from the public.

We ask that you respectfully contact the Bureau of Land Management and voice your opinion concerning these two travel management plans. Otherwise, Ranchers, Prospectors, fishermen, off-road enthusiasts, Hunters, mountain bikers, photographers, the handicap and so many others will lose access to our public lands and the places or things we enjoy the most. Bureau of Land Management wants to close dirt trails on our public lands to motorized access. This will prevent access to many areas that outdoor enthusiasts, local Ranchers, and others rely upon. It doesn’t matter what your outdoor activity of choice is. Or if you just enjoy seeing photos of our gorgeous landscapes. THIS WILL EFFECT YOU!

The Bureau of Land Management and the US Forest Service are mandated to create travel networks and designate certain Trails for travel and limit or close others. BLM is recommending a 30% closure to all motorized access. Very few trails will be designated for equestrian, hiking and mountain biking. Others will be closed altogether.

The Bureau of Land Management is required to give the public an opportunity to voice their opinion. Your opinion matters and will dictate the outcome of the Bureau of Land Management travel management plans. Please take the time to follow the links below and submit your comments via email, or US Postal Service. Contact information is included in each of the links I have provided.
Please see the most recent development with House Joint Resolution 44 that NOBODY has been talking about. It has CANCELED a lot of BLMs executive powers and returned them to the states, thus the people!

Current proposed Arizona road closures by BLM and what to do about them:

Most of these lands are used by miners, hikers, campers, hunters and off-roaders. What BLM is doing is proposing changes to these currently accessible roads, or basically……..restricting your access to your lands. First of all, RS2477 (revised statute 2477) is a part of the original 1872 mining grant. In a nutshell, it states the roads and travel routes must remain open for exploration, mining and usage. In 1976, Congress passed FLPMA, the Federal Lands Policy Management Act and claim they now can close all the roads willy-nilly at their discretion. Well, not so fast BLM and USFS. Under RS2477, they cannot close any roads which predate 1976. If it is a road “created” after 1976, they can, prior to that, no they can’t, it’s really that simple.

Just two years ago, Utah took this issue all the way to their Supreme Court and the court ruled unanimously that RS2477 is valid and their roads must remain open and accessible for public use and for mining. Like Utah, the Arizona Congress and the political body decided to protect their public roads and took it a step further than Utah. They passed a bill telling the Federal Government they cannot close roads under RS2477. So in clear language, Arizona told the United States government, any roads in Arizona which predate 1976, will not be close by the Federal Government under FLPMA period. End of story.

Arizona House Bill 2175 passed in April of 2015 and signed by Arizona’s Governor states just that. It prohibits the closure of these trails CLICK HERE to download HB2175

So what does all this mean? It means the Federal Government (BLM) has just given the middle finger to the state of Arizona, the residents, claim owners and folks who like to use these roads and is saying we don’t care what you say, that you passed a bill and we are going to ignore a “grant” passed by Congress in 1872 and are proposing to close your roads anyway.

So what do the folks in Arizona do? Call the sponsors of HB2175, the bill which was passed telling the BLM they can’t close these roads and ask these Congress folks what they are going to do about it. Make them stand up for you again. I would assume these politicians are going to be pretty upset the BLM is ignoring their laws they pass in this great state.

Here are the sponsors of HB2175 (the good guys who passed the bill on your behalf), call them today:

Rep Mark Finchem District 11
(602) 926-3122

Rep Bob Thorpe District 6
(602) 926-5219

Rep Brenda Barton District 6
(602) 926-4129

Senator Sonny Borelli District 5
(602) 926-5051

Rep Regina Cobb District 5
(602) 926-3126

Rep Vince Leach District 11
(602) 926-3106

Senator Steve Smith District 11
(602) 926-5685

The Arizona Attorney General reasserts these roads will remain open. It’s a great read and goes further than any other state we have ever seen in protecting your public lands and road access. CLICK HERE to read the statement from the attorney general. 
There it is………….don’t sit there and be silent, Call

Environmental Assessment

The Environmental Assessment document below is publicly available for download in the E Planning window under the “documents” section. The Environmental Assessment is drafted for the travel management plan to show the current OHV impact on the environment. Likewise, it shows the expected reduced impact after the Travel Management plan is implemented. Read the Environmental Assessment Before submitting your comments.

E PLANNING PORTAL

In the frame below you can navigate the BLM E Planning website. This is the portal to the Kingman Travel Management Plan. You will find ALL the documents, contact information, meetings, maps, and other data. It’s important to take note of the Environmental Assessment we have also embedded on this page below.

COMMENT MAP

The comment map shows all the trails and the proposed action. Green will remain open. Red will be closed. Purple will be limited use. You can choose a trail and submit a comment on that trail. Choose every trail you believe should remain open.

Using the comment map you can submit comments on individual trails. The map Shows the PROPOSED ACTION to be taken by the Bureau of Land Management. This is BLMs recommendation on what trails should be closed. This PROPOSED ACTION is 1 of 4 Travel Management Plan options given.

In the box below, you can choose between each of the 4 Travel Management plan maps. You can click on each trail and choose to submit a comment. Submit comments to each trail you believe should remain open or decommissioned. Make sure your comment makes sense, is straight to the point and contains factual information.

While submitting your comment be sure to mention your interest in the land. Do you fish there? Do you camp there? Does your family go on camping trips in the area? Do you know a rancher who leases or owns land in the area? Site the federal and state laws that are being broken by the BLM.

ONLINE COMMENT SUBMISSION FORM

Here You can submit comments on the environmental Assessment directly to BLM for review. Here it’s important you include the chapter and section your comment refers to. You can attach any documents that may support your comment. In addition, you can choose to add another comment to your submission. Please be respectful, professional and direct to the point.

TRAVEL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Here you can review the Travel Management Plan you’re commenting on. It’s important to review this document before you submit your comments. The document is embedded in this section. If you are using a smartphone you won’t see the document. Instead, you can use the link to download the PDF.




This web page has been designed in a way to quickly “copy and paste” a few lines of code and it can easily be reproduced on multiple HTML platforms. If you would like to embed the content of this page on your website please contact us. Likewise, this page has been designed to fit multiple different TMP’s after changing a few parameters. Please contact us for more information.

House joint resolution 44 might be the answer to the lack of management and oversight on our public lands.

Recently, on March 27th, 2017 President Trump signed House Joint Resolution 44 into law. It effectively canceled a Bureau of Land Management regulation which was part of a drastic overreach to put control of public lands fully within the federal government. It’s another step to force the federal government to work hand-in-hand with local governments for the future of our public lands.

President Trump signs joint resolution 44 to give States oversight of environmental regulations
Download the PDF of House Joint Resolution 44 HERE

The Bureau of Land Management rule which was titled “Resource Management 2.0” removed the state’s ability to make decisions on
environmental concerns. It’s a lengthy article and is entirely misrepresented. In the end, contracts between local governments and federal agencies have been canceled.
The Bureau of Land Management Resource Management 2.0 summary statement is as follows:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is amending its regulations that establish the procedures used to prepare, revise, or amend land use plans pursuant to the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA). The final rule affirms the important role of other Federal agencies, State and local governments, Indian tribes, and the public during the planning process and enhances opportunities for public involvement and transparency during the preparation of resource management plans. The final rule will enable the BLM to more readily address resource issues at a variety of scales, such as wildfire, wildlife habitat, appropriate development, or the demand for renewable and non-renewable energy sources, and to respond more effectively to change. The final rule emphasizes the role of using high-quality information, including the best available scientific information, in the planning process; and the importance of evaluating the resource, environmental, ecological, social, and economic conditions at the onset of planning. Finally, the final rule makes revisions to clarify the existing text and to improve the readability of the planning regulations.


Read the complete Bureau of Land Management Resource Management Plan 2.0 HERE

Federal officials are enforcing State and County laws without oversight or approval from the people.

When the people elect a sheriff they are relying on the sheriff to uphold the rule of law. The people vote for laws on the local level based on their needs. The sheriff is the supreme law enforcement authority over any said County. If people don’t like the sheriff and the law enforcement policy, they can elect him out of office. The Tenth Amendment of the US Constitution gives the sheriff supreme authority over all law enforcement activities regarding the said County. The sheriff is allowed to contract with the federal government and deputize federal agents to enforce County and state laws. The federal government is supposed to answer to the sheriff. All executive decision making lies on the sheriff. This effectively puts the power of the government in the hands of the people.
This is not the case with the Bureau of Land Management. In fact, what they are doing is illegal. The very law that governs the Bureau of Land Management policy is being violated. Federal Land Management agencies do not enact laws that are approved by the people. Their power is derived from executive decisions with oversight only from the federal government. This leaves a lot of room for interpretation. The Tenth Amendment of the US Constitution makes it illegal for the federal government to enforce state or County laws on the people.  

Arizona’s claims of rights-of-way under revised statute 2477

RS 2477 is part of the old mining Grant of 1866. Revised Statute 2477 was repealed by the Federal Land Management and Policy Act in 1976. However, the right to claim rights-of-way under RS2477 remained and the people, cities, towns, counties, and states are still allowed to claim RS2477 roads as long as they predate 1976. The Federal Land Policy Management Act states that any road that predates 1976 must remain open.
(Sec. 701. 43 U.S.C. 1701) reads “Nothing in this Act, or in any amendment made by this Act, shall be construed as terminating any valid lease, permit, patent, right-of-way, or other land use right or authorization existing on the date of approval of this Act”

Read the Federal Land Management and Policy Act HERE
In April of 2015 Arizona House Bill 2175 passed and was signed into law as ARS 37-931. This bill is Arizona’s claim of Rights of way under RS2477. Under ARS 37-931, the federal government (BLM, USFS) cannot close rights-of-way over federal land in Arizona. The Arizona law clearly states that a court order of competent jurisdiction can close a road that falls under an RS2477 claim. The law further states that the public has a right to use an RS2477 right of way. The law describes the condition of the right away, whether maintained or unmaintained, does not prohibit a right of way from falling under the RS2477 claim.
Read ARS 37-931 from the Arizona legislator website HERE

So what should the Arizona people do?

Now that President Trump has disapproved of the Bureau of Land Management’s rule on resource management it’s time for the people to call our elected officials and demand they enforce the law under Arizona revised statute 37-931. Call your local sheriff. Call the Arizona attorney general. Call the sponsors of House Bill 2175. Call the co-sponsors of house joint resolution 44. Imagine the outcome! We could finally get our public lands cleaned up! We will finally have law enforcement protecting our public lands. The people and the local governments will finally have a say.
Below you will find a list of the appropriate Arizona elected officials to call. Remember, these guys are on YOUR side. Please be respectful of your demands. They are in the highest position of power to fix the problems with our public lands. If we put pressure on them, they will be forced to work in our favor.
Co-sponsors of House Joint Resolution 44
Representative Andy Biggs

1626 Longworth House Office Building
(202) 225-2635

Representative Paul Gosar
2057 Rayburn House Office Building
(202) 225-2315
Sponsors of House Bill 2175
Rep Mark Finchem District 11
(602) 926-3122

Rep Bob Thorpe District 6
(602) 926-5219

Rep Brenda Barton District 6
(602) 926-4129

Senator Sonny Borelli District 5
(602) 926-5051

Rep Regina Cobb District 5
(602) 926-3126

Rep Vince Leach District 11
(602) 926-3106

Senator Steve Smith District 11
(602) 926-5685

Arizona Office of the Attorney General

Phoenix Office
2005 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004-2926
(602) 542-5025
Fax (602) 542-4085
Hours: 8AM-5PM

Tucson Office
400 West Congress
South Building, Suite 315
Tucson, AZ 85701-1367
(520) 628-6504
Fax (520) 628-6530
Hours: 8AM-5PM

Prescott Office
1000 Ainsworth Dr.
Suite A-210
Prescott, AZ 86305-1610
(928) 778-1265
Fax: (928) 778-1298
Hours: 8AM-5PM

Bouse and Cactus Plain Travel Management Plan

The Bureau of Land Management wants to hear from you! They want to hear from those who use these trails. They are giving the public an opportunity to voice their opinion. The public scoping commentary period has been extended and we have limited time. August 13th, 2018 is the deadline. You can use the interactive map in the window below. You can choose a trail on the map and submit a comment regarding that specific Trail. Inside this page, you also find detailed documents regarding studies and other information about the closures.

Bouse and Cactus Plain Travel Management Plan 41% TRAIL CLOSURE

We ask that you respectfully contact the Bureau of Land Management and voice your opinion concerning these two travel management plans. Otherwise, Ranchers, Prospectors, fishermen, off-road enthusiasts, Hunters, mountain bikers, photographers, the handicap and so many others will lose access to our public lands and the places or things we enjoy the most. Bureau of Land Management wants to close 60 to 80% of the dirt trails on our public lands to motorized access. This will prevent access to many areas that outdoor enthusiasts, local Ranchers, and others rely upon.

It doesn’t matter if you’re an off-road enthusiast, mountain biker, hiker, mountaineer, angler, hunter, gold prospector, rancher, cultural explorer, equestrian enthusiast, photographer or if you just enjoy seeing photos of our gorgeous landscapes. THIS WILL AFFECT YOU AND YOUR FAMILY!

The Bureau of Land Management and the US Forest Service are mandated to create travel networks and designate certain Trails for travel and limit or close others. BLM is recommending an 80% closure to all motorized access. Other Trails will be designated for equestrian, hiking and mountain biking. Others will be closed altogether. The Bureau of Land Management is required to give the public an opportunity to voice their opinion. Your opinion matters and will dictate the outcome of the Bureau of Land Management travel management plans. Please take the time to follow the links below and submit your comments via email, THE COMMENT MAP, or US Postal Service. Contact information is included in each of the links I have provided.

Current proposed Arizona road closures by BLM and what to do about them:

Most of these lands are used by miners, recreationists, hikers, campers, hunters and off-roaders. What BLM is doing is proposing changes to these currently accessible roads, or basically……..restricting your access to your lands.

First of all, RS2477 (revised statute 2477) is a part of the original 1872 mining grant. In a nutshell, it states the roads and travel routes must remain open for exploration, mining, and usage. In 1976, Congress passed FLPMA, the Federal Lands Policy Management Act and claim they now can close all the roads willy-nilly at their discretion. Well, not so fast BLM and USFS. Under RS2477, they cannot close any roads which predate 1976. If it is a road “created” after 1976, they can, prior to that, no they can’t, it’s really that simple.

Just two years ago, Utah took this issue all the way to their Supreme Court and the court ruled unanimously that RS2477 is valid and their roads must remain open and accessible for public use and for mining.

Like Utah, the Arizona Congress and the political body decided to protect their public roads and took it a step further than Utah. They passed a bill telling the Federal Government they cannot close roads under RS2477. So in clear language, Arizona told the United States government, any roads in Arizona which predate 1976, will not be close by the Federal Government under the FLPMA period. End of story

Arizona House Bill 2175 passed in April of 2015 and signed by Arizona’s Governor states just that. It prohibits the closure of these trails CLICK HERE to download HB2175

HB2175

YOUR BROWSER DOESN’T HAVE A .PDF PLUGIN. INSTEAD, YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THE FILE HERE

So what does all this mean?

It means the Federal Government (BLM) has just given the middle finger to the state of Arizona, the residents, claim owners and folks who like to use these roads and is saying we don’t care what you say, that you passed a bill and we are going to ignore a “grant” passed by Congress in 1872 and are proposing to close your roads anyway.

So what do the folks in Arizona do?

Call the sponsors of HB2175, the bill which was passed telling the BLM they can’t close these roads and ask these Congress folks what they are going to do about it. Make them stand up for you again. I would assume these politicians are going to be pretty upset the BLM is ignoring their laws they pass in this great state.

Here are the sponsors of HB2175 (the good guys who passed the bill on your behalf), call them today:

Rep Mark Finchem District 11
(602) 926-3122

Rep Bob Thorpe District 6
(602) 926-5219

Rep Brenda Barton District 6
(602) 926-4129

Senator Sonny Borelli District 5
(602) 926-5051

Rep Regina Cobb District 5
(602) 926-3126

Rep Vince Leach District 11
(602) 926-3106

Senator Steve Smith District 11
(602) 926-5685

The Arizona Attorney General reasserts these roads will remain open. It’s a great read and goes further than any other state we have ever seen in protecting your public lands and road access.

CLICK HERE to read the statement from the attorney general.

There it is………….don’t sit there and be silent, Call

E Planning Portal

In the frame below you can navigate the BLM E Planning website. This is the portal to the Bouse and Cactus Plain Travel Management Plan. You will find documents, contact information, meetings, maps, and other data. It’s important to take note of the Environmental Assessment we have also embedded on this page below.


Please navigate through the E planning portal and browse through the documents before submitting your comments through the comment map at the end of this page. Educate yourself on the proposed closures and documents.



Environmental Assessment

The Environmental Assessment document below is publicly available for download in the E Planning window under the “documents” section. The environmental assessment was conducted by a California based company called Advanced Resource Solutions. According to GovTribe, a $500,000 contract was awarded to Advanced Resource Solutions for their performance.

The Environmental Assessment is drafted for the travel management plan to show the current OHV impact on the environment. Likewise, it shows the expected reduced impact after the Travel Management plan is implemented. Read the Environmental Assessment Before submitting your comments. CLICK HERE to download the Environmental Assessment

Environmental Assessment

YOUR BROWSER DOESN’T HAVE A .PDF PLUGIN. INSTEAD, YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THE FILE HERE

COMMENT MAP

Using the comment map below you can submit comments on individual trails. The map Shows the PROPOSED ACTION to be taken by the Bureau of Land Management. This is BLMs recommendation on what trails should be closed. This PROPOSED ACTION is 1 of 4 Travel Management Plan options given. 


In the box below, you can choose between each of the 4 Travel Management plan maps. You can click on each trail and choose to submit a comment. Submit comments to each trail you believe should remain open or decommissioned. Make sure your comment makes sense, is straight to the point and contains factual information.

While submitting your comment be sure to mention your interest in the land. Do you fish there? Do you camp there? Does your family go on camping trips in the area? Do you know a rancher who leases or owns land in the area?

Site the federal and state laws that are being broken by the BLM.

This web page has been designed in a way to quickly “copy and past” a few lines of code and it can easily be reproduced on multiple HTML platforms. If you would like to embed the continence of this page in your website please contact us. Likewise, this page has been designed to fit multiple different TMP’s after changing a few parameters. Please contact us for more information.